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Conforming loan limits for 2022

When applying for a mortgage, one of the most popular options is a conforming loan. These loans are called “conforming” because they conform to the guidelines set by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, federally-backed home mortgage companies created by the U.S. Congress to boost homeownership.

What do Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac have to do with your home loan?
These entities exist only to support the U.S. mortgage system. They don’t originate loans. Instead, after a loan has been issued, one of the entities will buy the loan from the lender if it meets their criteria. This is an important part of the mortgage market because it allows lenders to sell loans to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac and use the cash raised to engage in further lending.

For a loan to be purchased by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac, the borrower generally needs:

  • A good credit score
  • A debt-to-income ratio of 50% or less
  • At least 3% down payment
  • A loan amount that’s equal to or less than the conforming loan limit

2022 conforming loan limits
Each year, the Federal Housing Agency decides what the conforming loan limit is. As houses become more expensive, the limits increase. In 2022, the amount increased substantially for all units.

https://www.fhfa.gov/Media/PublicAffairs/Pages/FHFA-Announces-Conforming-Loan-Limits-for-2022.aspx

­­Base limit: This is the maximum loan amount for homes in most areas of the United States.

High-cost limit: This is the maximum loan amount for homes in high-cost markets such as parts of Alaska, Hawaii, California, and Washington, D.C.

Units: The number of housing units per building.

More >> Check what the conforming loan limit is where you live.

Because conforming loans can be re-sold, they’re not as risky for lenders and often have favorable terms for borrowers. Savvy home buyers will keep their loan amount within the conforming loan limits so they have an easier time securing their loan, they’ll have more relaxed requirements, and their rates will probably be better.

If you’re looking for a conventional 15 or 30-year loan (as most people are), you may want to consider keeping the loan amount under the loan limit in order for it to be a conforming loan.

When you need a bigger loan – consider a jumbo loan
If the limits won’t get you a home you’re interested in buying, you could look into a jumbo loan. Jumbo loans won’t be purchased by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac, so they don’t need to conform to their loan limits – meaning you can get more money. If you have a strong credit score and low debt-to-income ratio, you may find a lender willing to extend one to you.

However, jumbo loans come with some disadvantages. They have stricter qualification rules, require a sizable down payment (sometimes 20% or more), and normally have a higher interest rate. For those reasons, a lot of homebuyers try to avoid them by finding a home that will keep them within the conforming loan limits.

To see whether you’ll be eligible for a conforming home loan, contact your local Mann Mortgage home lender. Together, they’ll help you crunch the numbers to see what type of loan would be best for you.

How to get ready to buy a house this year

Buying a house is a big life event. To make sure you start your journey on the right foot, we’ve put together a few things you’ll want to do before you step into your first open house. If you follow our tips, you’ll set yourself up to get the right type of home and home loan.

Check and improve your credit score
Your credit score (sometimes called a FICO score) will be used by your mortgage company to decide if you’re eligible to receive a loan and, if you are, the interest rate you’ll get. Scores range between 300 and 850 – the higher the score, the better. If your score is under 500, you have what’s called “challenged credit”. It’s not impossible to buy a home, but you’re going to struggle. Learn about buying a home with challenged credit. In general, the lower your score, the higher down payment your mortgage company may require.

Check your score for free once a year at annualcreditreport.com. If it’s low, you’ll need time to raise it. You can start by doing the following:

  • If you don’t have a credit history, get one. Take out a credit card and make your payments on time to show you’re credit-worthy. Not having a credit history can give you a very low credit score.
  • If your credit cards are maxed (or almost maxed) you’ll need to start paying them off. Using too much of your available credit can lower your credit score.
  • Pay bills on time. If your payments become 30-days past due they will likely be reported to the credit bureau and lower your credit score.

Decide where you want to live
Do you want to stay in the city, county, or state you’re in? Take a little time to research your options and make sure you know where you want to be for the next few years.

Contact a local mortgage lender
Working with a home expert who has connections in your community is always a great idea. They’ll know the local and state first-time homeowner and down payment assistance programs that can save you a lot of money – and that’s in addition to all the national loan and assistance programs. Together, you will go over your credit, income, and financial goals to find the best home loan.

Save for your down payment
The amount you need to save for a down payment depends on the type of loan you select and your financial situation. It can range from 0% of the total purchase price for a VA loan to as much as 20% or more for conventional or jumbo loans. Many people mistakenly assume you always need 20% down to purchase a home, and that’s just not the case.

Some people may chose to put as much down as possible while others will put the minimum down. Which is right for you? You and your loan officer can go through the pros/cons of each scenario to help you decide.

>> Get the scoop on how much you’ll need for a down payment.

Get pre-approved
Being pre-approved means your lender has already looked at your income, assets, debt, and credit report to decide how much they might be willing to lend you. It’s never a guarantee of a loan, but it’s much better indication (for both you and the person you’re buying from) that you’ll be extended a loan if you make an offer on a house.

>> Don’t make these first-time home buyer mistakes

Find a real estate agent to represent you
Once you’re a client, agents have a fiduciary responsibility to you. That means they are legally obligated to put your best interests first. They will know what to look for with a property and neighborhood, they will help you negotiate the price, and they will help you navigate the paperwork and legal issues with making an offer and purchasing a home.

After those steps are done, you’re ready to be a serious buyer with competitive offers on your next home.

Wherever you are on your journey to purchase a home, reach out to us. We are happy to go over your finances and goals and help you navigate the home loan process.

What happens to my mortgage when I die?

What happens to my mortgage when I die?

If you’re one of the 44% of Americans that has a mortgage, you may have wondered what would happen to your loan if you died. Let’s get into the details so you can rest in peace knowing what will take place.

First, a reminder about mortgage insurance
Mortgage insurance is an insurance policy that benefits your lender in case you, the borrower, default on your loan. If you die, and you had no co-signers on your loan to assume the debt or heirs who wish to take it over, your lender would reach out to the mortgage insurance company to make a claim towards recouping the remaining balance on your loan. Your home would also be put into foreclosure.

Now, let’s go over what might happen with your mortgage.

Option 1: Your heirs take over your mortgage
If you die before fully paying back your mortgage, your heirs can assume your mortgage if they choose to. Under federal law, lenders must allow family members the choice of taking over a mortgage when they inherit residential property. The lender can’t investigate whether they can repay the loan. The heir can either keep the loan in your name and pay on your behalf or refinance the loan to have it in their own name.

Option 2: Your estate pays off your mortgage
You can write in your will that other assets in your estate will be sold to pay off your mortgage. If there are enough funds to pay off your mortgage, the home can either be sold and the funds divided among your heirs, or one of your heirs can take over the title of your home.

Option 3: Yours heirs sell the home
If the mortgage payments are too much for your heirs to assume, they can sell the home. If the lender agrees to it, the home can be sold through a short sale. That means the property is sold and the proceeds fall short of the mortgage debt. But after the sale, the lender is satisfied, and your heirs will not owe any additional money.

If a short sale is not possible, the loan will go into foreclosure and the house will be put for sale. Depending on the state where the home is located, your estate or heirs may be responsible for paying further money if the foreclosure sale does not fully satisfy the outstanding loan debt. However, the following states have an anti-deficiency law where this is prohibited: Alaska, Arizona, California, Connecticut, Hawaii, Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oregon, Washington, and Wisconsin. In those states, your lender cannot sue your heirs for the remaining mortgage debt after the sale of the home.

Option 4: Your reverse mortgage is paid off
A reverse mortgage loan comes due upon the death of the borrower. If you have no other co-borrower that is living, your heirs will have to make sure the loan is paid back. This can be done using money from the estate or by selling the home. If the home is sold, your heirs will inherit whatever equity is left after your lender is repaid.

Option 5: Your Home is Seized to Pay Other Debts
Depending on the state where your home is located, your home may need to be sold to pay your debts after your death. Your heirs may keep what is left after your debts are paid.

If you have any questions about your home loan, reach out to your local Mann Mortgage lender. If you’re nervous about paying off your home loan before you die, they can help you go over the pros and cons of refinancing for a shorter term.

A good debt-to-income ratio

It’s the amount of debt you have compared to your income. Lenders use your debt-to-income ratio to decide whether you’ll be likely to repay your debts to them.

To figure out what your debt-to-income ratio is, add up your ongoing monthly bills. Minimum credit card payments, rent, auto loans, and student loans. Only consider your minimum payments, not the total amount you owe. Add them all up and divide it by your gross monthly income (before taxes and other deductions). This is your debt-to-income ratio and it’s written as a percentage.

As example, if you had a $1,100 monthly car payment, $300 minimum card payment, and $300 minimum student debt payment, your total monthly bills would be $1,700. If your monthly income is $5,000, your DTI ratio would be 1,700/5,000 = 0.34. 0.34 x 100 = 34. Your DTI would be a very healthy 34%.

DTI scores
Your lender’s biggest concern is whether you can pay back the loan. Your DTI score is just one of the calculations they use to help decide. They’ll also look at your FICO score, employment history, income, assets, and more.

At a minimum, they want to see your ratio under 50%. It’s ideal to have yours closer to 35%, but ranges between the two are acceptable.

Average debt per American
It’s difficult to tell what an average DTI ratio is, but we can say what the average amount of debt is. A 2021 CNBC report calculated the average American has $90,460 in debt. That includes their credit cards, personal loans, mortgages, and student debt. The higher an individual’s income, the higher their debt (and the easier it is for them to pay off).

Age 18 to 23: $9,593
Age 24 to 39: $78,396
Age 40 to 55: $135,841
Age 56 to 74: $96,984
Age 75+: $40,925

>> What do home lenders do when you have student loan debt?

Reducing your DTI
There are just two ways to do it. Reduce your monthly expenditures or increase your monthly income. Both options will take time and effort but pay off in the long run.

Rather than deciding on your own if your DTI is too high, consider talking to your home lender to go over it together. Local home lenders, like Mann Mortgage, will review your DTI and work with you and your unique financial decision to find the right loan.

6 things you shouldn’t do when you’re pre-approved for a mortgage

Just because you’re pre-approved for a loan doesn’t mean you’re guaranteed to get final approval on your loan. When your offer has been accepted and it’s time to begin closing on your loan, your mortgage lender is going to take another detailed look at your credit history, assets, income, and FICO score. You want to make sure you look just as good as you did the day you got pre-approved. How can you do that? 

Don’t miss payments
They’re going to see whether you’ve been late or missed any payments on your credit cards or loans since you were pre-approved. Just one 30-day late payment can negatively impact your credit report by many points. Make sure you have all your medical bills, parking tickets, and utility bills up-to-date and paid too! 

Don’t apply for new credit
Applying for new credit will lower your credit score and, if you’re approved, increase your debt-to-income ratio – a key factor lenders consider when you apply for a mortgage. These changes could affect the terms of your loan or get it denied altogether.

Don’t change jobs
This might be out of your control, but it’s best to stay with the job you had when you had your loan pre-approval. Switching jobs could signal a change in income, which may impact the amount you’re approved to borrow.

Don’t make any large purchases
You might be tempted to start shopping for furniture or appliances for your new home, but you shouldn’t do it. If you put the charges on your credit card, your debt-to-income ratio will change. And if you pay cash, you’ll have less money for a down payment or as an asset. Hold off on any large purchases until you’ve closed on your new home!

Don’t make big deposits
Any big cash deposits into one of your accounts prior to your mortgage closing looks fishy to an underwriter. They’re trained to spot evidence of borrowers needing to be gifted money for their mortgage – a clear sign the borrower may default. If it’s inevitable that you’ll have a deposit over $1,000, expect to be able to show the origin of the funds to your mortgage company. Transferring money between your accounts is generally fine.

Don’t refinance your loans
Don’t refinance your loans for a lower rate until after your home loan has closed. Refinancing is considered taking out a new line of credit, which isn’t good for someone looking for a mortgage. An established loan you’ve been making regular payments on looks better to mortgage underwriters than a new lower-interest loan you haven’t made many payments on yet.

What SHOULD you do?
Talk to your mortgage expert if you have any question on your current credit score or how your actions will affect your pre-approval. Your local Mann Mortgage branch is dedicated to making your experience both personalized and hassle-free.

What is a home equity line of credit?

A home equity line of credit (HELOC) uses the equity you’ve built in your home as collateral to get an additional loan. Since you’re using your home as collateral, lending institutions generally are able to offer much more favorable interest rates than you would get from an unsecure borrowing source (like a credit card company).  

Home much money can you get from a HELOC?
Each lending institution has different guidelines that dictate how much they can lend you. Their guidelines are usually based on your loan-to-value ratio (LTV), which is the amount of principal on your mortgage compared to your home’s appraised value. Most often, you’ll need at least 20% equity in your home (which is a LTV of 80%) to qualify. As example, if your home’s current value is $300,000 and the remaining balance on your mortgage is $250,000, you would have an LTV of 83%. For many lending institutions, you would not qualify for a HELOC.  

However, if your home’s current value is $300,000 and the remaining balance on your mortgage is $175,000, your LTV would be 57.9% and you would normally qualify for a HELOC for up to 80% of the equity in your home. In this example, you may have access to $65,000. 

Be aware that many lenders won’t give you a HELOC for less than $25,000.  

How do you get the cash?
Much like a credit card, you’ll have a revolving line of credit available. You can access your funds through an online transfer, a check, or a credit card. As you borrow more from your line of credit, your payments will increase though the rate of interest will remain the same.  

When do you have to pay back your HELOC funds?
Even if you get a HELOC, you don’t have to use the funds. As long as your lender doesn’t require you to do minimum draws, it could be a good source of emergency cash or a temporary safety net. If you do need to use the cash, the interest rates are lower than the rates tied to credit cards. 

The benefits of a HELOC
Even if you get a HELOC, you don’t have to use the funds. As long as your lender doesn’t require you to do minimum draws, it could be a good source of emergency cash or a temporary safety net. If you do need to use the cash, the interest rates are lower than the rates tied to credit cards.

The cons of a HELOC
The rate on your HELOC might fluctuate, and if it goes too high, you may have a hard time paying off your interest. Furthermore, your lender may decide to reduce your line of credit if your home’s value takes a drastic dip. And, don’t forget your overall debt load will increase with a HELOC or any other second mortgage.

Alternatives to a HELOC
One potential alternative is a cash-out refinance, which you could also use to pay for a home renovation or to pay off credit card bills.

>> Learn more about a cash-out refinance.

Is a HELOC right for you?
If you have enough equity built into your home and need cash for a home improvement, to cover medical bills, to pay off credit cards, or to sustain your lifestyle after losing a job, a HELOC might be a great solution. To find your home’s current value and how much you could get from a HELOC, contact your local Mann Mortgage expert today.

6 things you shouldn’t do when you’re pre-approved for a mortgage

Just because you’re pre-approved for a loan doesn’t mean you’re guaranteed to get final approval on your loan. When your offer has been accepted and it’s time to begin closing on your loan, your mortgage lender is going to take another detailed look at your credit history, assets, income, and FICO score. You want to make sure you look just as good as you did the day you got pre-approved. How can you do that?  

  1. Don’t miss payments

They’re going to see whether you’ve been late or missed any payments on your credit cards or loans since you were pre-approved. Just one 30-day late payment can negatively impact your credit report by many points. Make sure you have all your medical bills, parking tickets, and utility bills up-to-date and paid too! 

2. Don’t apply for new credit

Applying for new credit will lower your credit score and, if you’re approved, increase your debt-to-income ratio – a key factor lenders consider when you apply for a mortgage. These changes could affect the terms of your loan or get it denied altogether.

3. Don’t change jobs

This might be out of your control, but it’s best to stay with the job you had when you had your loan pre-approval. Switching jobs could signal a change in income, which may impact the amount you’re approved to borrow.

4. Don’t make any large purchases

You might be tempted to start shopping for furniture or appliances for your new home, but you shouldn’t do it. If you put the charges on your credit card, your debt-to-income ratio will change. And if you pay cash, you’ll have less money for a down payment or as an asset. Hold off on any large purchases until you’ve closed on your new home!

5. Don’t make big deposits

Any big cash deposits into one of your accounts prior to your mortgage closing looks fishy to an underwriter. They’re trained to spot evidence of borrowers needing to be gifted money for their mortgage – a clear sign the borrower may default. If it’s inevitable that you’ll have a deposit over $1,000, expect to be able to show the origin of the funds to your mortgage company. Transferring money between your accounts is generally fine.

6. Don’t refinance your loans

Don’t refinance your loans for a lower rate until after your home loan has closed. Refinancing is considered taking out a new line of credit, which isn’t good for someone looking for a mortgage. An established loan you’ve been making regular payments on looks better to mortgage underwriters than a new lower-interest loan you haven’t made many payments on yet.

What SHOULD you do?

Talk to your mortgage expert if you have any question on your current credit score or how your actions will affect your pre-approval. Your local Mann Mortgage branch is dedicated to making your experience both personalized and hassle-free.

How much will your down payment on a house be?

A down payment is a minimum cash payment a buyer makes during the closing process to secure a loan on a home purchase. Down payment requirements vary for different types of loans, and can range from as low as 0% of the total purchase with a VA loan to as much as 20% or more for conventional or jumbo loans. Similar to your mortgage rate, your down payment amount will be determined in large part by your credit score, the purchase price of the home, and the type of loan you and your loan officer determine will help you the most given your circumstances.

The amount you need depends on the type of loan you get. Below are the six most common types of home loan options and their minimum down payment requirements.

Conventional loan
Minimum down: 3%
These loans are used for purchasing a primary residence, secondary home, or investment property. Though you can put down 3%, you will have to pay private mortgage insurance (PMI). It ranges in cost from 0.55% to 2.25% of the original loan amount per year and is broken down into monthly payments. It ranges in cost from 0.55% to 2.25% of the original loan amount per year and is broken down into monthly payments. Once you own 22% of your home, you can stop paying PMI. You can avoid PMI altogether with a 20% down payment.

FHA loan
Minimum down: 3.5%
Depending on your credit score, you may be able to secure a loan guaranteed by the Fair Housing Administration (FHA) with as little as a 3.5% down payment. FHA loans are available to people with lower credit scores (as low as 500), higher debt-to-income ratio (up to 50%), and with smaller down payments than some conventional loans allow. FHA loans allow the money for a down payment to come from a gift or charitable organization. Borrowers will need to pay an annual mortgage insurance premium (MIP) of between 0.45% to 1.05% of the loan amount – this fee will be paid annually but broken down into 12 payments and added to the monthly mortgage bill. If borrowers put down a 10% down payment, they’ll pay MIP for 11 years. If they put down less than 10%, they’ll pay MIP for the lifetime of the loan.

Jumbo loan
Minimum down: 20%
When someone needs a loan for more than conforming loans allow ($548,250 is most states), a jumbo loan is an option. Since they are too large to be guaranteed by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac, qualifications to get this loan are tight and borrowers will need an excellent credit score. A 20% down payment is standard, but some lending institutions may require more.

USDA loan
Minimum down: 0%
These loans are designed to improve the economy and quality of life in rural America. If you’re buying a primary residence in a rural area, you may qualify for a USDA loan. You’ll need a credit score of 640 (though some lenders will offer loans for less) and meet income restrictions for the area you’re buying in. Borrowers will pay an annual fee equal to 0.35% of the loan balance (broken down into 12 monthly payments and added to the mortgage bill) as well as a one-time funding fee of 1% of the loan amount due when the loan closes.

The USDA provides this color-coded map to show which areas they classify as “rural”.

VA loan
Minimum down: 0%
If you’re an active member or veteran of the U.S. military (or a surviving spouse) you may be eligible for a Veterans Affairs (VA) loan. The VA doesn’t set a minimum credit score requirement for VA loan eligibility, but lenders typically will. Normally, it’s around 660, but you’ll need to check with your individual lender to see what their qualifications are. Borrowers will need to pay a one-time funding fee of 1.4% to 3.6% of the loan amount and can be paid upfront or rolled into the loan amount. There are no private mortgage insurance fees associated with a VA loan.

What’s the right down payment for you?
Finding the down payment amount depends on your financial goals, your loan eligibility, and other factors. Work with your loan officer at Mann Mortgage to identify the loan programs you qualify for and to help you decide which is best option for achieving your home buying goals.

Buying a house when you have student loan debt

More than half of all college students have taken on some form of debt in order to pay for their education – mostly through student loans. The average outstanding amount owed? Between $20,000 and $24,999. If you’re among those that have student loan debt, what are your options for getting a home loan?

How Do Lenders Look at Debt?
When issuing credit, lenders biggest concern is whether a borrower will be able to pay the loan back. They use a lot of calculations to figure it out. One of the major ones is to divide the borrowers’ monthly debts by their monthly gross income. This is called a borrower’s debt-to-income ratio.

To get an idea of your debt-to-income ratio, consider the amount you pay each month for your minimum credit card payments, auto loan, rent, mortgage, student loan, and other monthly payments. Keep in mind that lenders will look at what you pay each month, not the total amount you owe. If you have $20,000 in student loan debt and make $200 monthly payments, your lender will use the $200 monthly payments in the calculation. Now, divide the amount you pay each month by your gross monthly income (before taxes and other deductions). This is your debt-to-income ratio.

Generally, lenders want to see, at a minimum, a ratio of 50% or less.

Should You Pay Down Your Student Loans Before Getting a House?
Thinking about waiting to purchase a home until your student loan debts are paid down can feel like putting your life on hold. Whether you should pay off or down your student debt really depends on your unique financial situation. The price of a home ownership far exceeds just the monthly mortgage bill. There’s insurance, property taxes, utilities, maintenance, and plenty of small expenses. On the flip side, making a wise investment in a home could provide you with financial stability in the right real estate market.

Speak openly with your home loan officer to decide whether now is the right time for you to invest in a home. They’ll be able to give you expert advice about your real estate market, interest rates, and financial requirements for loans you may qualify for.

What Home Loans are Available to People with Student Debt?

Many loan options are available to people regardless of the type of debt they have. Some favorites among young borrowers with student loans are conventional, USDA, VA, and FHA loans.

Conventional loans
If you have decent credit and can make a down payment of at least 3.5%, a conventional loan will offer you many great benefits including PMI fees that stop once you reach 22% equity in your home.

USDA loans
If you’re looking to purchase a primary home in an area defined as “rural” by the USDA, a USDA loan is a great choice. Chief among the benefits for those with student loan debt is a 0% minimum down payment and no private mortgage insurance fees.

VA loans
Another great 0% down payment option for those who are former or current members of the U.S. military. VA loans are available to fund the purchase of primary residences only.

FHA loans
If your credit has been diminished by student loan payments, consider an FHA loan. They’re available to borrowers with FICO credit scores as low as 500. You’ll have to make a down payment of 3.5 to 10% depending on your credit score, but it may be a good option to start building financial stability with a home.

Should You Buy A Home Now?
Depending on your financial goals, taking advantage of the low interest rates might be a great choice. Contact your local loan officer to help you make the decision about whether you’re ready for home ownership or if it would be more advantageous to wait.

Buying a home with challenged credit

Buying a home with bad credit can be a challenge, but it’s not impossible. Your credit score – whether it’s good or bad – is just one of the factors your home lender will use to decide whether you’re eligible for a loan.

What is a bad credit?
Bad or “low credit” typically means your FICO score is under 600. FICO credit scores range from 300 to 850 and represent how likely you are to pay back a loan. Your score is calculated based on your payment history, amount owed, length of your credit history, new credit, and the mix of credit you have. Your score is used by lending agencies to determine whether you’ll be eligible for a loan and at what interest rate. The closer your score is to 800, the more loan options and lower interest rates you’ll have access to. Lenders tend to define the scores as:

Exceptional: 800+
Very good: 740 – 799
Good: 670 -739
Fair: 580 – 669
Very poor: 300 – 579

To check your credit report annually, you can visit annualcreditreport.com to see what your current FICO score is. It’s free to use once a year and it won’t impact your credit rating.

What’s the minimum credit score needed for a home loan?
There isn’t a universal minimum credit score needed to get a home loan. Instead, each mortgage lender decides the minimum credit score they’ll accept. But when a score is under 600 it’s classified as “subprime” and your loan options drop significantly. A score under 550 is going to have very limited loan options with very high interest rates.

Other factors mortgage companies use
Besides your FICO score, a lender will evaluate how much money you have for a down-payment, how much debt you already have, your credit history, and your income. To increases your chances at getting a loan with bad credit, the best option is to have as large a down payment as you can afford to minimize your risk to the lender.

A potential borrower with a low credit score but a sizeable down payment and a decent credit history is more likely to be approved for a loan than someone with low credit, a small down payment, and no credit history.

How much more will bad credit scores cost in the long run?
Since early 2020, interest rate on mortgages have dropped. Lower mortgage rates mean smaller monthly payments for principal and interest – and a lower cost for the loan over its life. That said, there’s still a big difference between how much someone with good credit will pay compared to someone with a bad credit score.

From the chart below, you can see a borrower with a credit score of 639 will end up paying $95,091 more in interest over the lifetime of the loan than a borrower with a credit score of 760.

Source: MyFICO.com

What home loans are available to someone with bad credit?
FHA loans are insured by the Federal Housing Administration and are designed specifically for borrowers with low credit and lower-to-middle income. You’ll need a down payment to qualify for FHA loans, but your mortgage lender may be able to secure a loan through them even if you have a FICO score as low as 500.

The best way to evaluate your loan options is to speak with a local mortgage expert. Based on your financial goals, loan eligibility, and local real estate conditions, they’ll be able to help you find the right loan for your needs.

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